Smart connections: Don’t take aggregate for ‘granite’

It is not always obvious how much transportation touches the lives of people. But the folks over at the National Stone, Sand & Gravel Association (NSSGA) can tell you for certain how important aggregate is to the construction of the paved surfaces on which we all walk and ride.

How Many Pokémon Does It Take    NSSGAFor those who don’t know, the term “aggregate” is used in geology to describe rock made of one or more minerals. According to NSSGA, each American uses about 10 tons of aggregates every year. Aggregates are used in road building, paint, cleaning products and probably even more things than the typical person even imagines – like Pokemon.

The NSSGA recently admitted that its favorite Pokemon were rock types – Geodude and Onix.

“Did you know that according to the U.S. Geological Survey, 1.32 billion metric tons of aggregates were produced by quarries in 2015? That equals almost 30 billion Geodudes!

Additionally, every man, woman and child in America uses about 15,575 pounds of stone, sand and gravel per year. That’s enough material for every person to catch 15 Onix each!”

The NSSGA is not the first group to connect itself with Pokemon since the launch of Pokemon Go in early July turned the game into a mobile-cultural phenomena. However, it’s worth noting the way in which NSSGA found an aspect of the game – its rock-based characters – to highlight and tie back with its brand.

Certainly, it is easy to take aggregates for granted. We walk over them and drive over them every day. Thanks to the NSSGA, I’ll never look at them in the same way again.

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Author: Lloyd Brown

I am the director of communications for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. I enjoy running marathons and triathlons, playing guitar and spending time with family. My professional interest is in how social media and new technology shapes the communication relationship between government and the general public. I have a Master’s degree in Communications and Leadership from Gonzaga University in Spokane and a bachelor’s degree in Communications from Washington State University.

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