Transportation Communicating is About More Than Cars and Highways

Even as the price of fuel remains low and national vehicle miles traveled grows on our nation’s highways, there is no doubt that bicycling — whether competitively or recreationally — is growing in popularity.

Most states have policies and programs in place to support bicycling programs and infrastructure. In addition, state transportation departments tend to have employees who bike regularly. In many states the chief engineers and transportation CEOs regularly cycle and serve as the strongest advocates for bicycling.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials now offers organized rides during its annual meetings. Participants often include state DOT directors and transportation secretaries, as well as engineers, planners and policy advocates.

Here’s a video from Wyoming DOT talking about bicycling safety. In full disclosure, it includes a couple of clips captured in May during one of those AASHTO bike rides. And one of those riders is me (spot the blue vest at about 56 seconds into the video).

The League of American Bicyclists each year publishes a ranking of bike friendly states. I know that a handful of states that watch those rankings closely and work to improve their bicycling programs.

However, whether you agree with the rankings or not, the evidence is clear and obvious. Communicating about transportation in today’s world must consider everyone who might be using the system – pedestrian, driver, transit user or cyclist.

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Author: Lloyd Brown

I am the director of communications for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. I enjoy running marathons and triathlons, playing guitar and spending time with family. My professional interest is in how social media and new technology shapes the communication relationship between government and the general public. I have a Master’s degree in Communications and Leadership from Gonzaga University in Spokane and a bachelor’s degree in Communications from Washington State University.

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