State DOTs Expand Use of Social Media but Implementation Challenges Remain

Social Media ReportWhile most state departments of transportation now actively use social media in their regular communication programs, further adoption of the online tools is being hampered by some familiar age-old challenges, according to the fourth annual State DOT Social Media Survey by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.

The survey, which is conducted each spring, asks state departments of transportation about their use of social media tools and issues related to deployment of social media tools as a way to measure the adoption, implementation and best practices for the industry. (Editor’s note: Full disclosure time. I annually help write the survey and help analyze the results of this report for AASHTO, which is my employer).

This year’s report found that nearly 90 percent of respondents are using both Facebook and Twitter accounts to communicate with the public, by far the most popular social media tools for state DOTs. By comparison, “In 2010, less than half of state DOTs used Facebook and only 26 states had Twitter accounts.”

But when asked to describe their biggest challenge, state DOTs consistently said a lack of available resources needed to keep up with the ongoing proliferation of social media tools. In other words, the promise of free, more efficient and low-cost tools to improve connections with transportation customers has proven a huge drain on time. One survey respondent said that while their staff resources were being cut by 10 percent, the expectations that the team would grow the social media program – and monitor the conversations in the burgeoning online space – was a major challenge.

The challenge was expressed in different ways. For instance, in another state, a survey respondent said that developing fresh content to feed the social media channels was a major effort for a small staff. Another mentioned that the new tools are demanding employees with different skill sets than they might already have on their teams.

The annual survey also identified those areas of focus that lay ahead for state DOTs. According to the report, “state DOTs that make their information available in mobile formats this year grew by 5 percent (68 to 73 percent). Half of those states offer mobile apps and 73 percent have mobile-friendly web sites.” Additionally, state DOTs said there is a growing awareness of, and interest in, measuring social media activity and engagement levels.

Ultimately, the results of the 2013 social media survey do not show huge shifts in tools. But the survey does show a growing increase in maturity and sophistication in how states are using social media tools to improve the quantity and quality of information sharing and engagement with transportation users.

Advertisements

Author: Lloyd Brown

I am the director of communications for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. I enjoy running marathons and triathlons, playing guitar and spending time with family. My professional interest is in how social media and new technology shapes the communication relationship between government and the general public. I have a Master’s degree in Communications and Leadership from Gonzaga University in Spokane and a bachelor’s degree in Communications from Washington State University.

1 thought on “State DOTs Expand Use of Social Media but Implementation Challenges Remain”

  1. Thanks for sharing! It is helpful to learn about the challenges facing our transportation departments in the realm of social media. I work as a consultant to transportation agencies, and your article has caused me to think about what I can do on my current projects to facilitate sharing of material via social media. It is a different way of thinking, and when we all collaborate, everyone wins!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s