Growing Your Twitter Followers, As Easy As 1-2-3

Accessible Twitter website icon
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You finally leaped over the legal team, juked past the IT group and came up with the perfect Twitter handle. Your transportation agency is now part of the mobile/social web. Your agency has a Twitter feed.  Congratulations!

Now, all you need are people to know you exist.

We can argue at length about the best Twitter metrics, but for most in our business, “followers” matter. And we all need them.

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Learning and Growing: What are you doing to stay fresh and current?

There is an aspect to communications work that is always evolving. We talk about it often here on this blog, that technology influences behavior and societal expectations for how transportation agencies can, and should, share information with its stakeholders and customers.

Keeping up with it all is hard work. From public participation to public information, communication and outreach best practices are evolving so rapidly that it is unreasonable for any one person to be considered the premiere expert on all of it.

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What Are The Best Practices for Measuring Transportation Communication?

Measurement in public relations is a difficult topic. While everyone agrees it is important, there is almost no agreement on the right approach, techniques and data. We live in an age of tremendous technological innovation and data surrounds us. Piles and piles of data. But we really do not agree on measurement.

For the transportation communicator this can be a challenge, especially when trying to build a case for executive support and investment in robust outreach and engagement campaigns. How do we, as a profession, show a return on investment or a proof of performance for well-meaning organizational leadership that may not fully understand our business?

Continue reading “What Are The Best Practices for Measuring Transportation Communication?”